Mount Hooker

After breakfast at one o’clock… I became desirous of ascending one of the peaks, and accordingly, I set out alone on snowshoes … The labor of ascending the lower part, which is covered with pines, is great beyond description, sinking on many occasions to the middle. Halfway up vegetation ceases entirely, not so much a…

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Old Botany Bay

by Mary Gilmore I’m old Botany Bay; stiff in the joints, little to say. I am he who paved the way, that you might walk at your ease to-day. I was the conscript sent to hell to make in the desert the living well. I bore the heat, I blazed the track- furrowed and bloody…

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Australia's Pioneers

by Mary Gilmore Even the old, long roads will remember and say, “Hither came they!” And the rain shall run in the ruts like tears; And the sun shine on them all the years, Saying, “These are the roads they trod” — They who are away with God. As featured onThe Daily Gardener podcast: Words…

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So Frail are We

by Agnes Falconer So frail are we, pale are we, Mist-thin, ghost-white — Hark o’er us, spring’s chorus Trills all life’s delight! And no leaf stirs in all the wood Yet see! our blossoms quiver! Dance these not in thy solitude — Forever!   Note: Windflower is the common name for Anemone blanda. As featured…

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The First Day of Spring is One Thing

by Henry Van Dyke The first day of spring is one thing, and the first spring day is another. The difference between them is sometimes as great as a month. As featured onThe Daily Gardener podcast: Words inspired by the garden are the sweetest, most beautiful words of all. Henry Van Dyke

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There's Rosemary That's for Remembrance

by William Shakespeare Oberon: I know a bank where the wild thyme blows, Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows, Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine, With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine: There sleeps Titania sometime of the night. — A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act 2, Scene 2     Note: Today is the birthday of…

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Seeming and Savor All Winter Long

by William Shakespeare There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance. Pray you, love, remember. And there are pansies, that’s for thoughts. — Ophelia from Hamlet, Act IV, Scene 5     Note: Today is the birthday of William Shakespeare. He was born on this day in 1564. The Bard’s works are loaded with references to plants and…

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William Shakespeare

by William Shakespeare There’s Rosemary and rue: these keep Seeming and savor all winter long. — Winter’s Garden Act 4 Scene 4       Note: Today is the birthday of William Shakespeare. He was born on this day in 1564. The Bard’s works are loaded with references to plants and gardens. Naturally, roses were…

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The Jore Mountains

by William Bartram It was now after noon; I approached a charming vale… Darkness gathers around, far distant thunder rolls over the trembling hills… all around is now still as death. A total inactivity and silence seem to pervade the earth; the birds afraid to utter a chirrup… nothing heard but the roaring of the…

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Nancy Cardozo

by Nancy Cardozo This is a primrose morning, The wind has put up her hair; The bells, hung in my cherry tree, are still – No birds feast there. I walked up the noon hill, Saddest of prim things. I met a fair child selling  bunches of butterfly wings. I gave him a painted ball…

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Primrose

A primrose by a river’s brim Is not a rose nor Is it prim.     Note: Primrose Day is April 19th. On April 30, 1947, the little primrose verse above was printed in the Chicago Tribune. Primrose Day commemorates the death date of Queen Victoria’s favorite Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli. His favorite flower was the Primrose.…

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Black-Eyed Susan

by John Gay All in the Downs the fleet was moored, The streamers waving to the wind When Black-Eyed Susan came on board; Oh! Where shall I, my true love find? Tell me, ye jovial sailors, tell me true, If my sweet William sails among your crew. William, who high upon the yard, Rocked with…

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Black-Eyed Susan

by The Baltimore Sun Susan came to Maryland, not on the Ark or the Dove, but a migrant from the Midwest mixed in clover and hayseed.     Note: Today, on April 18, in 1918, Maryland selected the Black-Eyed Susan as the State Flower. This was after much debate. The Baltimore Sun, among many others,…

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Gilbert White Journal Entry on April 17, 1789

Five gallons of French brandy from London. Cucumbers show fruit in bloom. Cuculus cuculat: the voice of the cuckoo is heard in Blackmoor Woods. Sowed Hollyhocks, Columbines, Snapdragons, Stocks, Mignonette, all from S. Lambeth, in a bed in the garden. Also Sweet Williams, & Canterbury Bells.     Note: On this day the Naturalist Gilbert…

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